Patriot's Primer
<<<.......Artsite Home Page
<<<......."Patriot" Home Page
<<<.......Feel Welcome to find me! Contact Information

American Basics
The motive behind this page was to create a patriotic reference, since, at upper-midlife, I found that my grasp of some basics had developed feeble spots.

Fun Start is this quote from Icon Patriot, Benjamin Franklin:
"If you would not be forgotten as soon as you are dead & rotten,
either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing."

Hope you feel this writing is worth the reading and that you will write me back - elle

Patriotism is defined as Love of Country. And Love is an action word.
Most of us cannot help Red Cross, or be a Navy Seal Commando, or a Great Statesperson, or a President, or make huge contributions to patriotic orgs.
Most of us can, however, upgrade our patriotism on the private and personal level;
we can be better informed and share it with others with the right spirit.
The spiritual focus of each of us counts for something.
If we honor and enjoy the gift of life and our American Freedoms, it should be little burden to do our share patriotically.
I hope this page makes it easier, still.

To begin with, critics of the Internet may change their mind
after one visit to The Official White House web site.

The site is a visual and informative treat, with pages for the scholar and the child, and all the rest of us between.

There are also e-mail links that allow you to connect with special people, sign up for newsletters from the White House, or you might enjoy the live interactive interviews with White House notables, plain and fancy:
the First Lady, heads of US Departments, the White House Chef, and including Presidential Pooch, Barney!

For study and research, there are links to archives of past speeches and interviews.

Special Event pages !
I never miss a visit to The Official White House web site,
at the major holidays, when the site offers dazzling visual treats!

I sell Whitehouse.gov with a passion because it makes us feel a natural part of "our own" Nation, as we should, and also because one of my artworks is displayed there - just a tiny one, for Connecticut USA, at the2007 White House State Easter Egg Display. Just change the year number in the url to view the lovely submissions from other years.



More for the Serious Researcher:
Until recently, our archives and historic records have been accessible only to the pros at
The National Archives and Records Administration ( NARA)
but now an easy-access world for all Americans.
The first NARA web site, www.nara.gov launched in 1996. The first redesign of the web site, www.archives.gov launched on May 31, 2002. The Web Program Staff, which is part of the Policy and Communications Staff at the National Archives, maintains the site. For more information about NARA's mission please see the following page on the web site http://www.archives.gov/welcome/index.html.




And I am refreshing my American basics at NARA's Charters of Freedom. Consisting of:
  • The Declaration of Independence
  • The Constitution of the United States of America
  • The Bill of Rights

    They were returned to display in the Rotunda of Capitol in Washington, D.C. on September 18, 2003, upon completion of the renovations to the building.
    Every American should have some acquaintance with these three documents, without which, most of us could not do a normal day.

    ~ USHistory.Org ~





    Nobel Prize for Peace


      Note:
    • US Laureates (winners ) are listed in bold.
    • For years not listed, no award was made.


    1901
    Henri Dunant (Switzerland); Frederick Passy (France)

    1902
    Elie Ducommun and Albert Gobat (Switzerland)

    1903
    Sir William R. Cremer (U.K.)

    1904
    Institut de Droit International (Belgium)

    1905
    Bertha von Suttner (Austria)

    1906
    Theodore Roosevelt (U.S.)


    1907
    Ernesto T. Moneta (Italy) and Louis Renault (France)

    1908
    Klas P. Arnoldson (Sweden) and Frederik Bajer (Denmark)

    1909
    Auguste M. F. Beernaert (Belgium) and Baron Paul H. B. B. d'Estournelles de Constant de Rebecque (France)

    1910
    Bureau International Permanent de la Paix (Switzerland)

    1911
    Tobias M. C. Asser (Holland) and Alfred H. Fried (Austria)

    1912
    Elihu Root (U.S.)

    1913
    Henri La Fontaine (Belgium)

    1917
    International Red Cross

    1919
    Woodrow Wilson (U.S.)


    1920
    Leon Bourgeois (France)

    1921
    Karl H. Branting (Sweden) and Christian L. Lange (Norway)

    1922
    Fridtjof Nansen (Norway)

    1925
    Sir Austen Chamberlain (U.K.) and Charles G. Dawes (U.S.)


    1926
    Aristide Briand (France) and Gustav Stresemann (Germany)

    1927
    Ferdinand Buisson (France) and Ludwig Quidde (Germany)

    1929
    Frank B. Kellogg (U.S.)

    1930
    Lars Olaf Nathan S?derblom (Sweden)

    1931
    Jane Addams and Nicholas M. Butler (U.S.)

    1933
    Sir Norman Angell (U.K.)

    1934
    Arthur Henderson (U.K.)

    1935
    Karl von Ossietzky (Germany)

    1936
    Carlos de S. Lamas (Argentina)

    1937
    Lord Cecil of Chelwood (U.K.)

    1938
    Office International Nansen pour les Refugies (Switzerland)

    1944
    International Red Cross

    1945
    Cordell Hull (U.S.)

    1946
    Emily G. Balch and John R. Mott (U.S.)

    1947
    American Friends Service Committee (U.S.) and British Society of Friends' Service Council (U.K.)

    1949
    Lord John Boyd Orr (Scotland)

    1950
    Ralph J. Bunche (U.S.)

    1951
    Leon Jouhaux (France)

    1952
    Albert Schweitzer (French Equatorial Africa)

    1953
    George C. Marshall (U.S.)

    1954
    Office of U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees

    1957
    Lester B. Pearson (Canada)

    1958
    Rev. Dominique Georges Henri Pire (Belgium)

    1959
    Philip John Noel-Baker (U.K.)

    1960
    Albert John Luthuli (South Africa)

    1961
    Dag Hammarskj?ld (Sweden)

    1962
    Linus Pauling (U.S.)

    1963
    Intl. Comm. of Red Cross; League of Red Cross Societies (both Geneva)

    1964
    Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (U.S.)

    1965
    UNICEF (United Nations Children's Fund)

    1968
    Rene Cassin (France)

    1969
    International Labor Organization

    1970
    Norman E. Borlaug (U.S.)

    1971
    Willy Brandt (West Germany)

    1973
    Henry A. Kissinger (U.S.); Le Duc Tho (North Vietnam)1

    1974
    Eisaku Sato (Japan); Sean MacBride (Ireland)

    1975
    Andrei D. Sakharov (U.S.S.R.)

    1976
    Mairead Corrigan and Betty Williams (both Northern Ireland)

    1977
    Amnesty International

    1978
    Menachem Begin (Israel) and Anwar el-Sadat (Egypt)

    1979
    Mother Teresa of Calcutta (India)

    1980
    Adolfo Perez Esquivel (Argentina)

    1981
    Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

    1982
    Alva Myrdal (Sweden) and Alfonso Garc?aRobles (Mexico)

    1983
    Lech Walesa (Poland)

    1984
    Bishop Desmond Tutu (South Africa)

    1985
    International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War

    1986
    Elie Wiesel (U.S.)

    1987
    Oscar Arias S?nchez (Costa Rica)

    1988
    U.N. Peacekeeping Forces

    1989
    Dalai Lama (Tibet)

    1990
    Mikhail S. Gorbachev (U.S.S.R.)

    1991
    Daw Aung San Suu Kyi (Burma)

    1992
    Rigoberta Mench? (Guatemala)

    1993
    F. W. de Klerk and Nelson Mandela (both South Africa)

    1994
    Yasir Arafat (Palestine), Shimon Peres, and Yitzhak Rabin (both Israel)

    1995
    Joseph Rotblat and Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs (U.K.)

    1996
    Carlos Filipe Ximenes Belo and Jose Ramos-Horta (East Timor)

    1997
    International Campaign to Ban Landmines and Jody Williams (U.S.)

    1998
    John Hume and David Trimble (Northern Ireland)

    1999
    Doctors without Borders (France)

    2000
    Kim Dae Jung (South Korea)

    2001
    United Nations and Kofi Annan

    2002
    Jimmy Carter (U.S.)


    2003
    Shirin Ebadi
    ( Iran - lawyer and human rights activist)


    1. Le Duc Tho refused prize, charging that peace had not yet really been established in South Vietnam.






  • My Personal Patriot Primer


    Little Miss Memorial Day, blythe spirit, firstborn of idealists, gifted and talented, my life had been Arts and caregiving, but always an occasional rescue, and a sense that it would get challenging, through some of it, before it was done. Years later, I realized that "halcyon days" and "special and good insights" were a delightful burden, and strive to share their gifts well. My siblings, younger brother and sister, are happy matches and friends I am proud to know.

    My late husband's family were very wealthy and diplomats before the crash of'29, and his Father had been a Federal Agent for the Treasury Department, and his Mother, Catholic "Silver Spoon", worked for Saint Francis Hospital for twenty-five years as dietician. Half their six chidren were caregiving personalities, and the other half natural "Feds", whatever their actual occupations. My Late Mother-in-Law was a "mighty mite", her four-foot-ten frame never stopped, and she delivered all six children a little prematurely..."unsinkable Molly Brown" reborn, I am told, in her ways.
    Did she know that half of them would die too young, like she did? I'll never know. I never met her. Her second son was an accountant, and on her deathbed, she asked him to refrain from "taking it into law enforcement",in his Father's footsteps, to minimize the health hazards she feared were threats for him and his siblings. However, when the entire USA "hit the bricks" in jogging shoes, my brother-in-law broke his promise to his Mother, and became a Federal Agent, too.

    My husband, his Big Brother, simply said to me, " I won't be as long-lived" I blanched...his motives were the highest, personally and professionally, I adored him helplessly and saluted him, felt brave and noble, at 23, " in harness", our son on one hip, and newborn daughter on the other...I'd loved my Nancy Drew, as well as my art, and thought we were Emma Peele and Steed....cool, delicious secrets,and I got to do it in heels, and feel so smart, dedicated and loving...no bored and boring housewife, me! The chores flew along , with this added demand.... to make the perfect home and family circle, anyway, and moreso...i.e., I loved it!

    My own husband was no slacker, a leader in school and sports and scouts in childhood, a partner in show co -ord in college, where he majored in Chemistry, but "opted-out" of Chem.Warfare, on moral grounds had served in VietNam and honorably, with USArmy Corps of Engineers as a commissioned officer, and come home intact. Both of us were outrageousy happy to have been able to weather it, and with his new work, on our own in another part of the country, it was a sunshiny day.

    My husband's team had finished building the plant, and were manufacturing digitalis and unguents, and our children were in the best stage for fun and travel after work, so we had a finer-than-average time of it during the Bi-Centennial visits to Washington DC. As a girl I visited on arts trips, and USACE Officers' Training was just South, so we weekended with other romantic couples in Georgetown...and when I resumed arts studies, again visited for the Arts...at ODS, my ARC workstops included NHQ there...a favorite place, and happy to be planning another visit soon.

    But there was a fee. Our offstage habits were hot cocoa and Lord Of The Rings hobbits around the fireplace, in winter, with our pets and the children two new good readers, so I was shocked and concerned, and wondered what it could be, when ,on a "ladyvisit" to my married but childless sister back home, her husband served the pot, after the pots and pans. Pot's illegal...we don't do illegal in our family...snow in August..... I said nothing, but found myself giving the nod to my husband, pointedly, upon my return. Another visit was arranged with my sister, without her husband, at the home of her boss. She was house-sitting, as a favor, while her Boss' family, Reuger firearms family, were off on vacation.

    The greetings done, and fun supper and tour of the estate and horses, and we settled in to the den. I will never forget it, because I almost laughed aloud...the room was shady and shuttered, like a spy scene in "Casablanca"...I looked around, expecting Sydney Greenstreet, but when he did not appear, I settled into the classic comfy corduroy den sofa with coffee, and beside my Sister, and looked at her just once.

    "I'm scared.",she said. "They (her Boss and his wife) are vacationing too far...she brings home lots of "certain copper pots". On my last business trip with _________(my boss)," she went on," he kept looking over his shoulder. When I finally asked him what it was about, he said that the Middle Easterners were pestering him to sell them weapons, and when he refused, they put out a contract on him. He feared for his life."

    I shared a room, in childhood, with my Fairfield girl sister. We are good, we are "fair maidens", we are cool...so I expected " something of the sort" of what she had to say, and did not faint.

    I returned to home and husband, told him, my personal hero...he told his people, and the situation was "corrected". As usual, discretely, justly, without a shot having been fired. My sister, an" accidental double-agent", left the position, divorced the previously perfect husband, for his own redemption, moved to USVI and remarried a "mid-lifed-up" handsome sea captain, who had been happy in youth to extinguish fires on offshore oil rigs.

    The story found the headlines briefly and nicely , and went its way. With all at peace again, that meant that my security duties in it were done.

    "That was fun, and cool ! Let's do it again sometime !"...not too soon, though!...... and my Handsome Prince and I did dinner at Rive Gauche in Washington DC, again a Romantic, not political spot.... and, then home, and took the children on an outing.

    Unfortunately, such goings on were only beginning......(to be continued).



    I am not really an activist....my white, mixed-ethnic background was all-American and happy to help a friend at three in the morning, if need be. So, at mid-life, I have some archived prizes, awards and plaques, and will do them up for display one day.

    But any Patriotic page representative of my generation must include comment on the Civil Rights Movement:

    from "almost a namesake", Eleanora Fagan, a.k.a. Billy Holiday's "Strange Fruit" to Colin Powell, Condolezza Rice, and Martha Stewart's followup, B.Smith......we've com along well , this generation in American Racial integration Moments...and recent commeration of

    The "Little Rock Nine - Then and Now
    September 1957-the story timeline, and what a different world for all involved, a generation later. The Story of Ms.McCarty show it goes on and gets better because the loving spirit of the people involved goes on, and always will.
    Afghanistan, per CIA